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Reading the story from Staffing Industry Analysts today brought my morning smile. I thought I would extract the opening paragraph from Planet's "How to take an Interview" as the Do's and contrast with some of the actual Don'ts.

DO’S: Received from -- "Planet Interviewing Handbook"

“You have to sell yourself in an interview!”

You hear this directive all the time from people who are willing to give you free interviewing advice. However, the statement is virtually never followed up with instructions on exactly how you should be doing the selling. The purpose of this guide is to fill this gap by giving you concrete, specific actions that you can take to sell yourself. It is not the intent of this guide to turn you into a professional salesperson. Instead, it is meant to introduce you to only those basic selling skills that will be the most helpful to you and have the greatest positive impact as you interview for the next step in your career. So, don’t become stressed or discouraged if you don’t think you could succeed in sales. You are not trying to become a salesperson. You just want to be better at selling yourself than others interviewing for the same position. Before I get into the meat of the subject, let’s pause and think about the implications of the advice to sell yourself. In my opinion, the statement implies that:

1. You have to know your product thoroughly, and you are the product.

2. You have to prepare yourself for each interview in exactly the same way as a salesperson would, which is:

• You have to polish your interviewing skills.

• You have to plan for each interview just as salespeople plan for sales calls.

3. You have to think and act in the interview as a salesperson would, that is:

• You have to control the interview through the skilled use of questioning techniques. An interview is not simply an oral exam where you passively answer questions that test your knowledge.

• You have to close before you leave;

DON’TS:  Received from -- "Staffing Industry Analysts" e-news@staffingindustry.com

TAKING PHONE CALLS, BEING INTOXICATED AND OTHER JOB INTERVIEW DON’TS - July 11, 2019

From taking phone calls during job interviews to showing up under the influence of drugs, Express Employment Professionals surveyed business leaders and job seekers about the most inappropriate activities they have seen during job interviews. In one case, a candidate grabbed a doughnut without asking then proceeded to eat it during the interview; another job seeker arrived wearing bunny slippers.

Here’s what the business leaders said they have seen while interviewing candidates:

85% report a job candidate “showing up late.”

83% report a job candidate with “inappropriate clothing.”

49% report a job candidate with “inappropriate language.”

48% report a job candidate “eating or chewing gum.”

39% report a job candidate “responding to text messages.”

37% report a job candidate “answering a phone call.”

31% report a job candidate “bringing a child into the interview.”

31% report a job candidate “bringing a friend into the interview.”

26% report a job candidate “bringing a parent into the interview.”

24% report a job candidate being “under the influence” of drugs or alcohol.

“Aggressive pushback is usually the most shocking,” said Janis Petrini, an Express franchise owner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. In response to a question about job history, Petrini said one job candidate said it was “none of your business.” She saw another candidate “use his phone from the moment he sat at the desk until the moment he walked out of the door. He took several phone calls, a video chat and posted to his social media — and then proceeded to rush through the rest of the interview process.”

Mike Brady, franchise owner of the Jacksonville West office in Florida, said not only did an applicant take a phone call, the applicant “even held up a finger telling me to wait.”

Job candidates reported inappropriate behavior by their interviewers as well:

63% report an interviewer “showing up late.”

58% report having an interviewer with a “lack of preparation.”

51% report an interviewer “answering a phone call.”

39% report an interviewer “oversharing.”

30% report an interviewer “asking discriminatory questions.”

28% report an interviewer “wearing inappropriate clothing.”

An interview is an opportunity for a candidate to showcase his or her full potential, candidates who show they don’t care likely won’t get the job, Express CEO Bill Stoller said. But interviewers also need to be self-aware.

“In this tight labor market, the smallest thing could turn off a qualified candidate, and that’s not something you can afford,” Stoller said. The report was based on a survey of 310 business leaders and 212 job seekers.


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It is important to assess or clarify exactly what you are looking for short term and where you want to be long term. Remember, when changing your career, it also affects your family life and your social life. So, don't forget to include these categories in your list. Here are 8 categories to help you analyze your next career change:

  • What is your objective
  • What type of organization
  • Supervisory or not
  • Salary
  • Type of employment
  • Location
  • New technologies
  • You and/or your family

WHAT IS YOUR OBJECTIVE

Are you looking to gain new skills?

Do you want to move into a leadership position?

What technologies do you like working with the most?

Where do you want to be in 5 years and what will help you get there?

WHAT TYPE OF ORGANIZATION

Is there a specific industry you are interested in, i.e. finance, manufacturing, health, government?

Would you be interested in a large national/international company where there is room for transfers to other locations?

How about a start-up? Do you have the skills that could take a start-up to the next level? Or do you just like the excitement of new and innovative environments?

Do you like bureaucracy or are you more comfortable in a family environment?

SUPERVISOR OR NOT

Some people are made to be in a supervisory position, other people find it very challenging. There is nothing wrong with either side. It is important for you to analyze yourself and decide if you like and want the extra challenges that go with supervising people.

Do you like a challenging puzzle? If you like getting involved in a puzzle, then supervising might not be for you.

Supervising means making time for people and their problems and idiosyncrasies.

You must be tough and soft and fair.

HOW IMPORTANT IS SALARY

Is money the most important thing in your life right now? No shame in admitting this. Money makes the world go ‘round and helps you buy a house, go on a vacation, or pay off a loan.

Is learning a new skill more important than the salary?

Is this a good time to add extra experience and education to your resume and not worry as much about the salary? Sometimes a long-term career path means not necessarily going for the big pay cheque.

CONTRACT OR PERMANENT

Do you like the security of a permanent position? These can include scheduled raises, health benefits, vacation time, possibility for advancement. Your job may be like your family.

OR

Are you more comfortable being a contractor and being your own boss? Like having control of your salary and where the write-offs go? The larger salary compensates for time off between jobs. Do you like the idea of being able to take a summer off or travel for 4 months? Do you find that new people, new systems, new companies enhance your work experience, or do they give you stress?

LOCATION – TO COMMUTE OR NOT

Commuting is a big deal breaker on my list.

Do you like to drive?

Are you and the company close to public transportation?

How about the expense of car, parking, public transportation?

How long does the commute take? Are you going to be happy with needing an extra 2 hours for transportation?

Don't forget to think about those long Canadian winters when you factor in commuting.

NEW AND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

Are you comfortable with the technologies you are using, or do you want to train with the new technologies on the marketplace?

Keep up to date on new/emerging technologies and what companies/systems are using them.

What’s hot, what’s not? COBOL, Java, Hadoop. What companies offer training in the new technologies?

Read industry publications to keep up to date on emerging technologies.

Do you need to go back to school or take a course/certificate?

YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

Times change and so do you. Just graduated, no family ties – then long hours and travelling with your job are great. Add a family into the scenario or have an older parent you need to help with. Your needs change and so do theirs.

There is nothing more fun than coaching one of your kids at yours/their favourite sport. Will the new job provide the opportunity to get home early enough for that?

Does the new company have a day care centre?

Health Benefits can make a huge difference in your lifestyle.

Older parents, spouse’s career, are you at an age when you would like a little more time off. These are all factors that you have to analyze when you are looking for a new position.

WHAT FACTOR IS THE DEAL BREAKER FOR YOU?

Everyone has different needs. As you grow in your career your needs will change. It’s important to analyze each factor for each time in your life. Be honest! Changing careers and companies is a hard decision and not something you want to regret.

Start with these 8 factors and analyze each one.